Nostalgic memories and facts about ‘pappu mudda’ and rice balls

rice balls

One for me. please!

My earliest memory of rice or rather lunch/dinner, during childhood was that of little balls of rice made with palm by my mother and keeping these in the plate. She would then feed me these small balls at precise intervals, giving sufficient time for me to chew these rice balls.

Now, I too have started this practice of making rice balls for my daughter.

The sequence:

Usually, when the toddler is ready to eat rice, the mother or the granny (or any clode relative), mixes the soft rice with a little bit of ajwain (carom seeds, known as ‘vavu in Telgugu) and a little bit of ghee (clarified butter). And then makes small, rounded, rice balls of this ‘vavu annam’ with the help of the palm and lovingly feeds the child. Carom seeds enhance the digestion process, thus ensuring that the toddlers do not suffer from colic pain. This meal is altered with dal (lentils) and rice. And is introduced in the later stages of childhood. Most of the kids are fed cooked dal rice (pappu annam, as pappu refers to dal in Telugu) as this is packed with protein which is essential for their growth and development.  The dal is either cooked plain or with other vegetables, which I mentioned in my earlier post on variety of dal dishes. The cooked dal is coupled with rice, some ghee and salt. This is mixed well and made into small balls known as pappu mudda. These rice balls made with palms are known as ‘goru’ mudda in Telugu. Mudda means a ball made with a morsel of boiled rice. As far as I remember, it is the tastiest morsel and always brims with  ‘mothers’ love!

Why is a ‘mudda’ preferable?

By making small balls, the food remains intact and does not spill all over the place. Also, the quantity looks lesser to a child, who thinks that this can be consumed soon. As usually the toddlers are fussy about lunch or dinner.

Moreover, many grownups too, mix their rice, and make ‘mudda’s and savor them. As this is pretty neat and in addition, somehow these ‘rounded morsels’ taste better.

Rice balls from around the world:

Talking about rice balls, reminds me of my nostalgic trip to Nagoya, Japan. Here, for lunch we were given a ‘Bento box’ a typical Japanese lunch box, which contained neatly shaped rice balls. Onigiri or omusubi (rice balls) are staple of the Bento boxes. Though these were plain, a variety of accompaniments were included in the box. One had to pick these rice balls with chopsticks, dip it in the various sauces and savor it. I tried my hand at using chopsticks but unfortunately failed. And then resorted to eating these with a spoon. I noticed here that the Japanese people respect food and do not waste it. And they always bow as a sign of respect before partaking their meal.

rice

The neat ‘Japanese Bento meal box’!

Today, April 19, happens to be the ‘National Rice ball day’.

Some facts about ‘rice balls’ in various cuisines is listed below:

In Japanese cuisine:

a)      The staple diet of Japanese is rice. Their cuisine include rice balls which are plain or made with filling inside, and soaked in vinegar.

b)      The ancient tradition of making rice balls in Japan has been in place since the 11 century.

c)      The Japanese refer to these rice balls as ‘Onigiri’ which means ‘to hold on to’.

d)   Usually the rice ball is made with white sticky rice (plain or with a filling) and wrapped around with a piece of nori seaweed. These are beautiful shaped and decorated to depict cute faces.

In Italian cuisine: 
  1. Rice balls in Italian cuisine are called aracini.
  2. These rice balls seem to have originated in Sicily in the 10th century.
  3. They are made with short grain rice balls (plain or with a filling) which are coated with breadcrumbs and fried to obtain an orange color. Its name is derived from the word arancia which means orange in Italian. The filling inside may vary.
rice ball

Tempting!

About Cheesy Rice poppers:

Last Saturday, my daughter and I were watching, my favorite TV show, Living Foodz, we happened to witness the demonstration of a wonderful rice based snack: Rice cheesy rolls, which I have renamed as Cheesy rice poppers. I had earlier tried it but was a mishap. SO when my daughter asked me to make it this time, initially I refused. But on my daughter’s insistence and encouragement, I tried it and it did turn out to be tasty. And my daughter, Shreya, loved it!

By making this dish, one can utilize leftover rice, which is a great way of reducing wastage. Being a South India, we have rice for lunch and dinner. And there is always some leftover rice in my household.

The comforting familiarity of rice, coupled with the ‘gooey’ richness of cheese along with the crunchiness of breadcrumbs makes this snack is ‘a real’ treat’.

rice balls

One more please!

 

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Print Recipe
Cheesy Rice Poppers
By making this dish, one can utilize leftover rice, which is a great way of reducing wastage. Being a South India, we have rice for lunch and dinner. And there is always some leftover rice in my household. The comforting familiarity of rice, coupled with the ‘gooey’ richness of cheese along with the crunchiness of nreadcrumns makes this snack is ‘a real’ treat’.
rice ball
Course snacks
Cuisine indian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
persons
Ingredients
Course snacks
Cuisine indian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Servings
persons
Ingredients
rice ball
Instructions
  1. Add rice and mashed potatoes in a wide bowl. Mix well. Now add all the other ingredients in a wide bowl. Mix well, to form a pliable dough. Let the rice grain remain intact. Do not make it into a paste.
  2. Cut the cheese cubes into 4 longitudinal pieces. I used Amul cheese.
  3. Make a ball of the rice mixture with your right palm and flatten it in your palm with your left hand fingers. Place the long piece of cheese in the middle and fold the rice mixture over it. Shape into rolls.
  4. Heat oil in a small pan/kadhai.
  5. Make a thin maida water mixture, by adding maid to water in a bowl and mixing it well. Dip the rolls in this mixture and then roll it in the breadcrumbs. Fry it in hot oil.
  6. Let it turn light brown. Turn the roll to the other side and fry intil it turns light brown. Remove from oi and drain on absorbent paper.
  7. Savor these warm ‘filling poppers’ with tomato sauce or chutney.
    rice
Recipe Notes

Simple, rich and filling meal = 2 bowls of rice with a side dish like dal, curd or pickle!

-Aparna Mudganty Parinam

    1. udtikhabar April 19, 2017
      • Aparna Parinam April 20, 2017
    2. Clearissa Coward April 20, 2017

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